2 February 2012

The worst drug on the planet sold to us by the biggest gangsters?






Blaming the government, or Society, for the drink problem is ridiculous. Yes, life is hard. But at the end of the day, everyone is responsible for how much they drink, what drugs they take, how much they exercise and how healthy their food is. You can't expect the government to make you happy. It's this moaning, passive, depressing attitude that leads to alcohol abuse in the first place.



The government is expected to publish an alcohol strategy in the coming months. No doubt the focus will be on the headline grabbing policies, with Cameron recently hinting at the possibility of a minimum unit price on alcohol. Will it work?
According to the wonderfully middle aged, middle class, middle of the road Guardian; “The picture of alcohol harm in this country is stark; the death toll from alcohol misuse is the equivalent of a passenger filled jumbo jet crashing every 17 days. Furthermore, 80% of alcohol-related deaths are from liver disease, which is the fifth most common cause of death in England and is set to overtake stroke and coronary heart disease as a killer within the next 10 years."
The British Liver Trust argues that people with alcohol problems must be offered effective support and treatment to meet their individual needs, an ‘individual person-centred journey’ as the Government’s drug strategy would describe it. There has been much talk about ‘recovery’ and ‘abstinence-based approaches’ for those with alcohol dependence.  “Our report suggests that it is vital that people who misuse alcohol are not treated by a one-size fits all abstinence approach; but, to be as successful as possible, healthcare professionals must work with patients to understand their preferences in setting goals to reduce their alcohol harm. Problem drinkers are after all a mixed bag of people with a range of mild, moderate and severe alcohol dependence.” Will it work?



The major problem is alcohol is seen by the British public as NOT A DRUG, when it's actually one of the most dangerous and addictive substances out there. The distinction is totally arbitrary and surely only suits those in the alcohol industry. Good luck saving everyone from themselves. You're going to be engaged in a battle you can't win with people who, in the main, don't want to be told how to live their own lives.


 


Alcoholism is linked to high unemployment and all the other crisis situations for which we like to seek some oblivion. This advise to have two drink free days a week does appear somewhat nonsensical. Isn't the real problem binge drinking at weekends? I would have thought that most people try and have four drink free days Monday -Thursday and then spend the weekends getting lashed. Telling people to only drink a certain amount is completely out of touch with reality...that many people will drink until theyre drunk/run out of money/passed out at the worst or drink far more than is good for them at best.




There has been a heavy drinking culture in the UK for centuries way before there was even a union, with people drinking beer 24/7 instead of the very poor quality water. The gin stews. Then the strange pub opening times which encourage people to drink against the clock consuming a huge amount in a short period of time. Much excessive drinking is self treatment for stress and mental health problems. Most people do not want to admit to these issues to their GP and have it on their medical records, so they find their own ways to cope. Obviously this is a psychological problem.




We have a difficult life-work balance that makes us stressed, and for a lot of people alcohol is the best and easiest option to let go, relax, and be merry. Sometimes it's just the only way they know how to be social. I'm one of these people, so I know what I'm talking about.




Blaming the government, or Society, for this problem is ridiculous though. Yes, life is hard. But at the end of the day, everyone is responsible for how much they drink, what drugs they take, how much they exercise and how healthy their food is. You can't expect the government to make you happy. It's this moaning, passive, depressing attitude that leads to alcohol abuse in the first place.




The government and other concerned bodies are not going to achieve anything by recommendations. This is a byproduct of the society we have created. Perhaps instead of telling people not to drink so much or tax them more, they could focus on making living in this country a little bit more enjoyable. People here work some of the longest hours with little to show for it in return. Life on the continent seems a bit more people/life focused than it is here. A happier, more content population may feel less of a need to obliterate themselves every weekend. These people are going to lie to their GPs about how much they drink anyway.



In the short term, so long as there is stigma attached, if you want to get some proper societal response to alcoholism you need anonymous clinics for both mental health and alcohol problems, so people can address these issues without them going on their medical records. You need alcohol treatments people can drop into which are not based on religious doctrine. Then you need to de-stigmatise and address mental health issues.




Perhaps Baclofen would appear to be the answer, and it works for cocaine detox as well? Or give people the option of MDMA or cannabis instead.







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